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Symposium on Options for the Future of the NAEP Long-Term Trend Assessment

Thursday, March 2, 2017
Hilton Alexandria Old Town

 

On Thursday, March 2, the National Assessment Governing Board, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and guest experts discussed options for how best to proceed with the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Long-Term Trend (LTT) assessment. 

Background Information

The NAEP LTT assessment has been administered since the early 1970s, establishing a continuous national indicator of student achievement in reading and mathematics. Since the early 1990s, the LTT assessment has been augmented with a newer version of NAEP, commonly referred to as main NAEP.

Main NAEP is transitioning to a digitally based assessment. Given this and other issues, the Governing Board, in partnership with NCES, is gathering recommendations on how best to proceed with NAEP’s LTT assessment and its relationship to main NAEP.

To inform any decision-making, the Governing Board has solicited five papers that identify issues to be addressed for the LTT assessment and consider its relationship to main NAEP. This symposium provides experts in the fields of assessment and education policy an opportunity to share their recommendations and to engage with Governing Board members and audience participants on how best to proceed.

To facilitate the discussion, Dr. Edward Haertel, the Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus, at Stanford University, prepared a white paper on the history of the NAEP LTT assessment that includes a trenchant consideration of current issues. Speakers will discuss their responses to his paper.

 

 

Meet Confirmed Speakers and Panelists

Member, National Assessment Governing Board

Joe Willhoft is a consultant who recently worked for the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, both as the assistant superintendent for assessment and student information and as director of assessment. In addition, Dr. Willhoft served as executive director of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. He also led the research and evaluation department of Tacoma Public Schools for 15 years and served on numerous advisory committees and boards, including the Governing Board and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus, Stanford University

Edward Haertel is the Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus, at Stanford University. He has studied policy uses of achievement tests, validity arguments for high-stakes testing, the logic and implementation of standard-setting methods, trend comparisons across tests, and the use of value-added models for teacher evaluation.

His recent publications include the 2013 William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture, Reliability and Validity of Inferences About Teachers Based on Student Test Scores; "Reflections on the Gordon Commission" (2014); and "Fairness Using Derived Scores" (2016, with Andrew Ho). Over the course of his career, Dr. Haertel has served as president of the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME), as a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, and as chair of the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment. He is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and of the American Psychological Association (APA), and an elected member of the National Academy of Education.

Dr. Haertel has received career awards from the NCME, Division D of the AERA, Division 15 of the APA and the California Educational Research Association. He holds a doctorate in measurement, evaluation and statistical analysis from the University of Chicago.

Former President and CEO, Center on Education Policy

Jack Jennings is the former president and CEO of the Center on Education Policy, a Washington, D.C.-based nonpartisan, nonprofit education research organization, which he founded in 1995.

From 1967-94, Mr. Jennings served as subcommittee staff director and then as general counsel for the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Education and Labor. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and has served on the board of governors of the Phi Delta Kappa Foundation as well as on the boards of various other organizations.

Mr. Jennings has received many awards, most recently from the American Educational Research Association, the Learning First Alliance and the National Superintendents Roundtable. In March 2015, Presidents, Congress, and the Public Schools, his latest book on school improvement and the federal role over fifty years, was released by the Harvard Education Press.

Mr. Jennings's website is http://www.jackjenningsdc.com.

Director of Data, Research and Federal Policy, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Lou Fabrizio has been a member of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) for almost 24 years, working in different positions from 1978-81 and 1996-present. He was named the director of the Division of Data, Research and Federal Policy in August 2011 and is responsible for the management of the P-20W longitudinal data system federal grant, submission of several federal reports for the U.S. Department of Education, and understanding federal policy related to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) including the ESEA Flexibility (waiver) process and the more recent Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Dr. Fabrizio continues to serve as the state's federal liaison with the Education Department and has been the NCDPI point person in completing the NC ESEA Flexibility Request, the NC ESEA Educator Equity Plan and now the NC ESSA Plan. He also serves as an advisor to leadership in the Accountability Services Division, where he previously worked for 15 years overseeing the state's former ABCs Accountability Program, the statewide testing program, and the state's accountability and assessment plans for ESEA.

From 2007-15, Dr. Fabrizio was a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, which sets policy for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He currently serves as a member of the National Center for Education Statistics Advisory Task Force. He has been an active member of numerous other state and national committees and organizations, and previously worked in several different capacities for CTB/McGraw-Hill, the test publishing company, from 1982-96. He also worked as a head start director in Wake County (North Carolina) and a mathematics and science teacher at a private school in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Fabrizio holds a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Georgetown University. He also has a Master of Science degree in education administration and supervision, and a doctorate in educational research and policy analysis from North Carolina State University.

Professor, Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation, Boston College, and Executive Director, TIMSS & PIRLS International Study Center

Ina V.S. Mullis is a renowned expert in large-scale educational assessment, first nationally and then internationally. She is a professor at Boston College, where she is the executive director of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) International Study Center. Dr. Mullis played a leadership role in developing and reporting the results of the six TIMSS assessments, conducted every four years from 1995-2015 and the four PIRLS assessments, conducted every five years from 2001-16.

Currently, Dr. Mullis is developing eTIMSS, an innovative digital assessment for 2019. Prior to joining Boston College in 1994, she was the project director of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) at Educational Testing Service, and she serves on the NAEP Validation Studies Panel.

Former Senior Technical Advisor and Psychometrician, Assessment Division, National Center for Education Statistics

Until he retired in 2014, Andrew Kolstad was a federal civil servant working for the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). He served as the senior technical advisor and psychometrician for NCES's Assessment Division, with oversight on technical issues for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the National Assessments of Adult Literacy. Through his consulting firm, P20 Strategies, he does occasional work for the National Assessment Governing Board and for NAEP contractors such as Fulcrum IT and CRP, Inc.

Dr. Kolstad has an intimate acquaintance with NAEP's methods and procedures, developed over nearly 25 years in NCES's Assessment Division as the senior technical advisor to the program. He has deep knowledge of the psychometric and statistical methods used in assessment surveys, such as NAEP, and understands how assessment surveys function. He also has expertise in both the psychometrics of educational testing and the statistics of inference from complex (stratified and clustered) surveys. Dr. Kolstad took the lead role in designing the 2004 bridge study for the NAEP long-term trend assessments.

Dr. Kolstad earned a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from Columbia University (1967), and both a Master of Science and a doctorate in sociology from Stanford University (1971; 1976).

Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics

Since 2014, Peggy G. Carr has served as the acting commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the U.S. Department of Education. In this position, she oversees the collection, analysis, and reporting of education data from preschool through postsecondary education. Dr. Carr joined NCES in 1993 as director of analysis and reporting in the Assessment Division. In 1998, she was named the associate commissioner of assessment, responsible for national and international large-scale assessments, including NAEP, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies, the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, the Program for International Student Assessment, and the Teaching and Learning International Survey.

Considering the Future of the NAEP Long-Term Trend Assessment Program

American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting
Saturday, April 29, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, 304 A&B

At AERA's annual meeting in San Antonio, a panel of renowned experts, including staff from the National Assessment Governing Board and the National Center for Education Statistics, will debate the relative merits of the NAEP Long-Term Trend (LTT) program, and explore ways of consolidating or combining LTT and the main NAEP program. Read more about this 90-minute forum and explore materials below from a March 2 forum the Board hosted on this topic.